Have You Celebrated Poetry Month Yet?

April is Poetry Month!  We have some great titles in the first floor lounge that showcase the different ways poetry can speak to your heart.

Derek Walcott, Winner of the Nobel Prize and Saint Lucia’s favorite son, died last month.  We have a wonderful introduction to his decades of work Selected Poems Derek Walcott, Edited by Edward Baugh

The Persian poet and Sufi mystic Rumi is beloved by lovers of poetry all over the world.   If you know his poetry, you may want to check out a book about his life: Rumi’s Secret: The Life of the Sufi Poet of Love by Brad Gooch

Somos Como Las Nubes/We Are Like the Clouds is a moving and beautifully illustrated account of the tragic migrations of thousands of children in Central America to seek refuge in the US.  The poet, Jorge Argueta, was himself a refugee from El Salvador in the 1980s.

Kindle Users Experiencing Issues with eRead IL App

Hi Everyone,

We heard from eRead IL, one of our ebook services, that folks using the Axis 360 App (a Baker and Taylor product) on their Kindles are experiencing some problems:

“An app update released last week contained a bug that has been causing connectivity issues for patrons. Baker & Taylor has released a corrected version of the app to Apple, Google, and Amazon. The corrected version has been released by Apple and Google into the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store but Amazon has not yet rolled it out to the Amazon App Store. Kindle Fire users looking for the Axis 360 app in the Amazon App Store may receive a message that the Kindle Fires are no longer compatible with Axis 360. This is not correct. We do not currently have any indication from Amazon about when they will release the corrected app.”  –statement issued from eRead IL, 4/18/17

It is suspected the issue will be resolved soon.

Thanks!

This Week in Space History

One of the most dramatic events in space exploration history happened 47 years ago this week. On April 11, 1970, the Apollo 13 space mission was launched from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida; the goal was to be the third mission to land on the moon. Two days after the launch, an oxygen tank exploded, causing loss of power, heat, and water in the spacecraft. The carbon dioxide removal system also was damaged. Amazingly, the crew (with help from many people on Earth) was able to make the repairs necessary to return a few days later on April 17.

The library has this material on the subject:

Moraine Valley Student Trustee Debate April 2017

Candidates for MVCC Student Trustee discuss issues impacting students. This event sponsored by Student Life and the Student Government Association.

Moraine Valley Student Trustee Debate April 2017

The audio of this discussion is available below:

New to the Collection: Neither Snow Nor Rain by Devin Leonard

Do you ever wonder what might become of the U.S. Postal Service with the advancement of technology? We can print stamps at home on our personal computers, pay more and more bills online, use E-mail instead of “snail mail,” and even have packages shipped directly from vendors to recipients without ever setting foot in a post office. While stamps are probably one of the best bargains around, the U.S. Postal Service has been losing money, closing many of its offices, and debating whether to cut mail delivery days.

New to the MVCC Library collection is the book Neither Snow Nor Rain: a History of the United States Postal Service by Devin Leonard. The tagline always was that “neither snow nor rain” or any type of bad weather could keep the postman away. What could possibly keep them away would be dogs; in fact, I just saw a postman interviewed on a morning show this week stating that, while it’s humorous to think of, the biggest stumbling block for him has been dogs chasing him down! Even the word “snail” mail emanated from the dawn of E-mail because it was faster sending electronic mail than using the slow postal service.

An excerpt from Leonard’s interesting book reads: “In parts of America that it can’t reach by truck, the USPS finds other means to get people their letters and packages. It transports them by mule train to the Havasupai Indian Reservation at the bottom of the Grand Canyon. Bush pilots fly letters to the edges of Alaska. In thinly populated parts of Montana and North Dakota, the postal service has what it refers to as ‘shirt pocket’ routes, which means that postal workers literally carry all their letters for the day in their shirt pockets.” Hearing situations such as these remote delivery areas leads one to wonder if the U.S. Postal Service will continue to exist in the future…pick up this book and check it out!

For a limited time you can find the book shelved in the library lounge on the 2nd floor among the new arrivals. Otherwise, it can be found here in our catalog.

World Down Syndrome Day

“World Down Syndrome Day is observed annually on the 21st of March. This date is a global awareness day which has been officially observed by the United Nations since 2012. Why this date?  Because it is the 21st day of the 3rd month. The numbers represent the triplication (trisomy) of the 21st chromosome which causes Down syndrome.”

There are many organizations that help “raise awareness of what Down syndrome is, what it means to have Down syndrome, and how people with Down syndrome play a vital role in our lives and communities.”

A recent indie film, My Feral Heart, gives a positive portrayal of a young adult with Down syndrome.

 

 

 

 

Water, water, everywhere but not a drop to drink.

Although this statement is roughly from the poem, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, the residents of Flint, Michigan, might have said the same thing just a few years ago.

The March/April, 2017, issue of Popular Science, is devoted to water, and there are graphics and some text that show the use of water, drinking and otherwise, around the world. The graphics are excellent for those of us who love visual learning.

This magazine/periodical is located in the magazine racks by the Circulation Desk and Café of the library. Additionally, the articles are available in the Academic Search Complete database in either HTML (retyped) format or the PDF format that resembles the printed page. This last format has the graphics and is in color. For a quick link to Academic Search Complete, click here. For person-to person help, stop in and speak with a librarian at the circular desk known as Information/Reference.