MLA and APA Citation Help

It’s that time of the year again. As you are finishing your paper, you will need to properly format your citations using MLA or APA style. Help is available on the library website on the Research Tools page. Click “Citing Sources” in the middle of the Research Tools page (under Featured Services). The Citing Sources Guide has a variety of links that show citation examples for journal articles, web pages, books, and many other sources. As always, help is also available from the librarians or from the Speaking and Writing Center.

Ask the FCC to Support Net Neutrality

Libraries across US are speaking up today in support of Net Neutrality. The FCC is moving to create a two-tiered system (fast lane vs slow lane) on the Internet. For decades, libraries and librarians have stood up for privacy and fairness in accessing information. You can contact the FCC and lawmakers here: Battle for the Net.

This impacts all of us and will have implications for Moraine Valley students who may not have access to technology at home or who cannot pay additional money to access the fast lane. This is an important issue, and we should take note.

What is net neutrality?
“Net neutrality is the principle that Internet providers like Comcast & Verizon should not control what we see and do online. In 2015, startups, Internet freedom groups, and 3.7 million commenters won strong net neutrality rules from the US Federal Communication Commission (FCC). The rules prohibit Internet providers from blocking, throttling, and paid prioritization—”fast lanes” for sites that pay, and slow lanes for everyone else” (from Battle for the Net website).

Here are a couple of videos that explain the issue:

Why Net Neutrality Makes the Internet Great

Net Neutrality: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (from 2014, for mature viewers)

Don’t Fall for Fake News!

This term our library hosted three events focusing on understanding fake news. You can watch them on YouTube and download them as podcasts.


The Big Fake Out: Why Do we Fall for Fake News?

Our world of seamless information sharing and low-attention spans make it easy to spread news stories that are entirely fabricated. An entire industry of fake news sites has emerged generating advertising revenue for their owners. How do preexisting beliefs make us fall victim to outrageous stories? Why can’t we make rational decisions when it comes to evaluating information? How do our Why can’t we resist sharing articles that confirm our views? A panel of faculty members from philosophy, sociology, and psychology discuss these questions. Listen here: http://ext.morainevalley.edu/searchtips/the-big-fake-out-why-do-we-fall-for-fake-news/

Playing the Fake News Game: An Interactive Event & Discussion
Join us in playing our own news game that is in the tradition of NPR’s Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me. Can you separate fake news from actual news stories? Fabricated news stories spread across the internet like wildfire impacting how we understand our world and how we make decisions as citizens. This event will discuss ways we can prevent ourselves from falling victim to online falsehoods. Listen here: http://ext.morainevalley.edu/searchtips/playing-the-fake-news-game-an-interactive-event-discussion/

Fake News, Journalism, and Media with the Chicago Tribune’s Margaret Holt
Margaret Holt, Standards Editor with the Chicago Tribune, discusses her career as a journalist and editor. She also discusses the impact of fake news and the state of journalism. Listen here: http://ext.morainevalley.edu/searchtips/fake-news-journalism-and-media-with-the-chicago-tribunes-margaret-holt/

The Big Fake Out: Why Do we Fall for Fake News?

Our world of seamless information sharing and low-attention spans make it easy to spread news stories that are entirely fabricated. An entire industry of fake news sites has emerged generating advertising revenue for their owners. How do preexisting beliefs make us fall victim to outrageous stories? Why can’t we make rational decisions when it comes to evaluating information? How do our Why can’t we resist sharing articles that confirm our views? A panel of faculty members from philosophy, sociology, and psychology discuss these questions.

The Big Fake Out: Why Do we Fall for Fake News?

The audio of this discussion is available below:

Playing the Fake News Game: An Interactive Event & Discussion

Join us in playing our own news game that is in the tradition of NPR’s Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me. Can you separate fake news from actual news stories? Fabricated news stories spread across the internet like wildfire impacting how we understand our world and how we make decisions as citizens. This event will discuss ways we can prevent ourselves from falling victim to online falsehoods.

Playing the Fake News Game: An Interactive Event & Discussion

The audio of this discussion is available below:

Fake News, Journalism, and Media with the Chicago Tribune’s Margaret Holt

Margaret Holt, Standards Editor with the Chicago Tribune, discusses her career as a journalist and editor. She also discusses the impact of fake news and the state of journalism.

Fake News, Journalism, and Media with Margaret Holt from the Chicago Tribune

The audio of this discussion is available below: