Interesting Reads! New Non-Fiction Titles

FREE WOMEN, FREE MEN
Sex, Gender, Feminism
By Camille Paglia

A collection of essays from well-known feminist academic, Camille Paglia, who the New York Times Book review calls a “fearless public intellectual…more necessary than ever.” Paglia was recently featured in a cover story by Molly Fisher at the New York Magazine website The Cut titled, “Camille Paglia Predicted 2017: What the ’90s provocateur understands about the Trump era.”

THE INKBLOTS
Hermann Rorschach, His Iconic Test, and the Power of Seeing
By Damion Searls

Read about how in the 1920’s Rorschach created and used his test to identify illnesses of a psychiatric nature and predict the traits of an individual’s personality. The author of the book was interviewed by Robert Seigel for the NPR program All Things Considered on February 17, 2017.

IRRESISTIBLE
The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked
By Adam Alter

Having trouble putting down your phone? In IRRESISTABLE, Alter, professor of psychology and marketing at NYU, follows the rise of behavioral addiction as it relates to technology and examines why so many of these products are keeping us hooked. Read an excerpt online at Wired.

JOURNALISM AFTER SNOWDEN
The Future of the Free Press in the Surveillance State                          Edited by Emily Bell and Taylor Owen. With Smitha Khorana and Jennifer R. Henrichsen

This anthology includes voices from a number of major journalistic players, both online and in print, and provides information on source protection, modern security measures, legal ramifications for journalists, data access, modern interpretations of privilege, and how journalism today is influenced by the Internet and modern telecommunications policy. Read book editor Emily Bells’ interview with Snowden, that was integrated into the book, online at Columbia Journalism Review.

SEX AND THE CONSTITUTION
Sex, Religion, and Law from America’s Origins to the Twenty-First Century                                                                                                               By Geoffrey R. Stone

University of Chicago professor and constitutional scholar, Stone, offers insight into how sex became legislated and regulated in America. He includes the topics of obscenity, sodomy, abortion, birth control, and future issues facing the U.S. Supreme Court. Read Stone’s guest blog discussing the book at the Washington Post online.

Icebergs in the Desert

There have been numerous scientific theories on how to transform the deserts of the world into lush farmlands or dense forests.  Scientists have developed numerous permaculture projects specifically designed for dry land desert environments.  These projects range from”conserving scarce water and nutrients, building up fertile soil, and creating cooling micro-climates to protect tender crops from the desert heat.”  Other ideas are”Contour Trenching Technique“, which consists of digging trenches on contour elevation lines in the landscape and trapping precipitation in the trenches” or integrating solar power and desalination technology.

One idea that has been in the news recently is an attempt by the United Arab Emirates to drag an iceberg from the Antarctica (over 5,000 miles) to the coast of Fujairah.  It will be used to provide billions of gallons of fresh water and perhaps, as The Emirates’ weather experts hope, the enormous iceberg will change the weather system of this arid country.  Some scientists question the possibility of this plan harming the global climate.

Quick Facts on Icebergs

More information on the project

More information on icebergs and climate

 

Local Views on the Situation in Syria and Syrian Refugees

Two weeks ago, the MVCC Arab Student Union hosted an event in the Library on the crisis in Syria. Last night the US attacked a Syrian airbase in response to a chemical attack on the Syrian people (see BBC’s page referencing the Syrian War for coverage of these issues). After these events, it seems appropriate to reshare the conversation held in the library.


Syrian Refugee Discussion

World Down Syndrome Day

“World Down Syndrome Day is observed annually on the 21st of March. This date is a global awareness day which has been officially observed by the United Nations since 2012. Why this date?  Because it is the 21st day of the 3rd month. The numbers represent the triplication (trisomy) of the 21st chromosome which causes Down syndrome.”

There are many organizations that help “raise awareness of what Down syndrome is, what it means to have Down syndrome, and how people with Down syndrome play a vital role in our lives and communities.”

A recent indie film, My Feral Heart, gives a positive portrayal of a young adult with Down syndrome.

 

 

 

 

#TryPod: The Podcasts We Love

Our Librarians love podcasts, and we are joining the #TryPod effort to promote podcasts during the month of March 2017.

 

Don’t miss the Library’s two podcasts:

  1. The MVCC Library Podcast: Audio from library events and discussions with faculty.
  2. The Moraine Valley Broadcasting Channel: Student-created podcasts on a range of topics.

Here are some recommended podcasts from our Librarians

Sharon Byerly

  1. Filmspotting: Reviews of films and interviews with actors and others.
  2. Chewing: Discussions of food and health.
  3. Sound Opinions: Great music reviews and interviews.

Tony Dunbar

  1. CodeSwitch: Discussions about race, ethnicity, and culture and how they play out in the real world.
  2. Counter Stories: Discussions of culture, race, identity.

Terra Jacobson

  1. Women of the Hour: Lena Dunham talks about a range of topics aimed at women but definitely open for everyone.
  2. Radio Lab: Award winning show about curiosity and ideas.
  3. Dear Sugar: Honest advice on love, relationships, and all kinds of other stuff.

Tish Hayes

  1. CodeSwitch: Discussions about race, ethnicity, and culture and how they play out in the real world.
  2. Myths and Legends: Ever wonder where popular fairy tales come from? This podcast explores the bizarre and crazy origins of these stories.
  3. Invisibilia: About the invisible forces that control human behavior.

Barb Keleher

  1. Serious Eats/Special Sauce: Interviews with chefs and others about food.
  2. Stuff You Missed in History: Fills in the historic gaps.
  3. Maltin on Movies: Discussion of great films (many you haven’t heard of).
  4. Dan Carlin’s Hardcore History: This ain’t no joke! Serious history.
  5. You Must Remember This: History about the forgotten history of Hollywood.

Marie Martino

  1. Nerdette: Interviews with artists, authors, and others about nerdy stuff.
  2. Serial: Listen to a story unfold as the investigators follow the info.
  3. Bad at Sports: Interviews, discussions, and other stuff. Sorta art. Sorta journalism.

Troy Swanson

  1. FiveThirtyEight Podcasts: 538 focuses on using data to understand our world. They analyze politics, sports, and other stuff with numbers.
  2. Nerdist Podcast: Chris Hardwick interviews actors, writers, directors, musicians and tons of other people.
  3. iFanboy: The leading comic book podcast. These guys are funny.
  4. History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps: A full history of Western philosophy starting with the ancient Greeks and moving forward.
  5. I was There Too: Each week Matt Gourley interviews someone who was in the background of a famous movie.

Rebecca Tull

  1. New York Times Book Review: The most well-known book review source.
  2. Guardian Books Podcast: Books with an international flair.
  3. Slate’s Podcasts: Smart and timely topics from Culture Gabfest, DoubleX Gabfest, etc.
  4. The Axe Files: David Axelrod out of U of Chicago’s Institute of Politics talks with political leaders and thinkers.

If you are interested in listening to podcasts but are not sure how, check out this article from Digital Trends.

Transgender & Gender Identity

Explore our library’s collection of materials on transgender people, gender, and identity. You can browse the call number HQ77.95.U6 for materials on transgender people in the United States and HQ1075 for works on sex role and gender identity, located on the first floor of the library. Also, here is a list of five documentaries and motion pictures recently added to our collection to open the dialogue on transgender experiences, one of the current topics making headlines:

  • American Transgender originally aired on the National Geographic Channel in May 2012. This documentary follows the different lifestyles of three transgender individuals, addressing topics like identity and relationships.
  • Boy Meets Girl is a 2014 film regarding the changing relationship between Robby and his best friend, Ricky, a transgender girl.
  • The 2015 film by Tom Hooper, The Danish Girl, is based on the true life story of a transgender Danish painter, Lili Elbe.
  • I Am the Queen is a documentary examining the Vida/Sida Cacica Pageant in Chicago’s Humboldt Park neighborhood, where transgender participants compete in a pageant with support from the larger Puerto Rican community.
  • Sex, Lies & Gender is another National Geographic Channel documentary, originally broadcast in September 2009. The program explores how doctors and parents face gender decisions and the options in traditional and controversial therapies for transgender individuals.

 

 

ORWELL’S 1984 on AMAZON’S BESTSELLER LIST

 

 

The 2016 election may have helped propel Orwell’s 1984 to Amazon’s bestseller list.  The book, published in 1949, continues to be read especially at this time when everyone’s talking about fake news and ‘alternative facts’.

The MVCC library contains an interesting array of formats of 1984.

A visual history of the book covers of 1984.

View the Apple 1984 Super Bowl Commercial.

 

The 75th Commemoration of the Pearl Harbor Attack

It has been 75 years since a surprise attack on the U.S. naval base in Hawaii.  The air strike claimed the lives of more than 2,400 people and injured hundreds of people.  The Pacific fleet was severely damaged by the Japanese air force.  Franklin Roosevelt stated the “date which will live in infamy,”prompted Congress to declare war on Japan.

Click here for more information on Pearl Harbor

Click here for video of the actual attack.

Coming around again?

Are LPs making a comeback? For those of us with stacks of them in the basement, they never left. But statistics show that there seems to be renewed interest in the format. In 2015, revenues from vinyl sales were $416 million, the highest level since 1988. RIAA keeps these statistics and has other information about music sales on its website. And there’s a historical connection for this time of the year—Edison demonstrated the hand-cranked phonograph for the first time near the end of the year in 1877.