The Underground Church in North Korea: Life Across the 38th Parallel

Special guest Dr. Augustine Sohn, physician and associate professor at the University of Illinois, discusses his experience as a missionary in Korea. He will talk about the background, history, politics, religion, and the separation of North and South Korea. He will connect Christianity to the underground church, and talk about the connection with his church and North Korea. This event is organized by Moraine Valley’s Christian Fellowship.

The Underground Church in North Korea: Experiencing Life Across the 38th Parallel

The audio of this discussion is available below:

Sexual Violence in America’s 20th Century

Sexual violence has been an often present and yet often little recognized component of American history. Associate Professor Josh Fulton examines the role gender has played in the American story in the 20th century, and how prevalent sexual violence was throughout key periods in this time in America–from the ‘Jazz Age,’ the Jim Crow South, the Great Depression, World War II, and beyond. This event is part of our One Book, We Believe You program.

Sexual Violence in America’s 20th Century

The audio of this discussion is available below:

Presidential Portraits – Major Black History Moment during Black History Month 2018

Barack and Michelle Obama the first family of the 44th United States Presidency, assisted in the unveiling of their official President and First Lady portraits for the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery on Monday February 12th. With President and Mrs. Obama, being the first African Heritage American occupants of the White House within itself makes for quite the noteworthy Black History Month moment. Taking note that African Heritage American artists created the Obamas’ portraits, another first in American History, adds even more transformative cultural relevance to the moment. Michelle Obama’s portrait was rendered by Amy Sherald, while Barack Obama’s portrait was painted by Kehinde Wiley.

More Resources Regarding Portrait

JFK Assassination Information

On October 26, the National Archives will release classified documents about the John F. Kennedy assassination. Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States, was assassinated on November 22, 1963, in Dallas, Texas.

The library has these books and eBooks about the assassination.

The Assassination of John F. Kennedy: A Complete Book of Facts by James P. Duffy and Vincent L. Ricci (1992)

Bloody Treason: On Solving History’s Greatest Murder Mystery, the Assassination of John F. Kennedy by Noel Twyman (1997)

Where Were You? America Remembers the JFK Assassination compiled and edited by Gus Russo and Harry Moses; foreword by Tom Brokaw (2016)

“The President Has Been Shot!” The Assassination of John F. Kennedy by James L. Swanson (eBook and eAudiobook, 2016)

Remembering 9/11

Last year, for the 15th Anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on New York and Washington, we held a panel discussion with members of the MVCC community to remember and share. Many of our students where very young when the attack happened, so they do not have first hand memories of this day. We thought it was important to share our memories.

How 9/11 Affected Me: A Panel Discussion

History of Labor Day

Many states celebrated a “labor day” in the late 1800s but Labor Day became a federal holiday in 1894. One of the probable reasons for the federal holiday was that U.S. President Grover Cleveland was attempting to placate organized labor after the Pullman Strike, a nation-wide railroad strike that ended after many lives were lost and much property was destroyed. Workers began the strike at the Pullman Company in Chicago on May 11, 1894, as a reaction to wage cuts. You can visit the Pullman National Monument and Historic Pullman Foundation at 11141 S. Cottage Grove Ave. in Chicago.

Disco Demolition Exhibit

This is part three in the series of things to do in Chicago this summer.

In the exhibit “Disco Demolition: The Night Disco Died,” the Elmhurst History Museum has gathered memorabilia from an infamous July 1979 event during a doubleheader at Comiskey Park in Chicago. That day, radio station WLUP sponsored a promotion featuring DJ Steve Dahl, and anyone who brought a disco album to the park got in for 98 cents. The plan was to blow up the disco albums on the field after the first game. The albums were blown up, and then thousands of fans went out on the field and would not leave until the police showed up. The Sox had to forfeit the second game because of the condition of the field.

The book from 2016 about the historic night is available in the library. The Elmhurst History Museum is at 120 E. Park Avenue in Elmhurst.

“Summer in the City”

This is part one of a series of blogs that center around places to visit and things to do in Chicago this summer.

The Tribune Tower, constructed in 1923-1925, is an iconic symbol of Chicago. It is less than 25 miles  from the  Moraine Valley Community College campus. The Tower is an architectural jewel filled with treasures from all over the world. The treasures include rocks from the Colosseum in Rome, the Giza pyramid, the Arc de Triumphe, Aztec Ruins and the Berlin Wall. These are just a few examples of historic rocks that are incorporated in the walls of this building.

Check out more information on the Tribune Tower and other great Chicago architecture from the MVCC catalog.


From the Archives: Women’s History at Moraine Valley

Members of the Glacier Gals present doll house to hospital (left to right: Jackie Baker, Norma Allan, Penn Berrens, Lucille Glonek, and Shirley Lawrisak)

Women have been instrumental in the growth and success of Moraine Valley Community College since its founding in 1967. In turn, the college has implemented programs and organizations over the years to foster and support women’s education.

An early women’s group at the college was the Glacier Gals. The organization grew to as many as 85 members and was active from 1969 to 1974. Its objectives were to promote friendship among women associated with Moraine Valley, to perform services for the college, and to provide a scholarship fund for a female Moraine Valley student.

Article from The Reporter, a local newspaper, on September 2, 1971: Glacier Gals Donate Doll House To Hospital

In 1971, the Glacier Gals completed construction of a children’s doll house which they donated to Little Company of Mary hospital. In the same year, the women’s group donated $50 worth of books to the school library.

To learn more about women in the history of Moraine Valley, be sure to stop by the library on Wednesday, March 29 at 11 a.m. Dr. Sylvia Jenkins and Dr. Margaret Lehner will be joined by two retired faculty members, Dr. Sharon Fritz and Lenette Staudinger, for a panel discussion, “50 Years of Women’s Voices: Oral Histories of Moraine Valley”. The panel will be moderated by Dr. Linda Brandt, a counselor at Moraine Valley for over 40 years.

First page of the Glacier Gals 1971-1972 yearbook