This Week in Space History

One of the most dramatic events in space exploration history happened 47 years ago this week. On April 11, 1970, the Apollo 13 space mission was launched from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida; the goal was to be the third mission to land on the moon. Two days after the launch, an oxygen tank exploded, causing loss of power, heat, and water in the spacecraft. The carbon dioxide removal system also was damaged. Amazingly, the crew (with help from many people on Earth) was able to make the repairs necessary to return a few days later on April 17.

The library has this material on the subject:

Easy Recording

Need to record a podcast or narrate your powerpoints?

You can check out microphones and other recording equipment from the library to help you create podcasts, soundtracks, or other audio assignments. Or check them out for your own personal use.

For example, the iRig handheld microphone helps you easily make professional quality recordings with your phone or tablet—the microphone plugs into the headphone jack. A tripod stand is also available. You can check out the iRig microphone for 4 hours or for 1 week.

Cameras, headsets, laptops, microphones, cables, calculators, flash drives, adapters, and chargers are also available. Loan periods vary, depending on the item. Ask at the Circulation Desk.

Valentine’s Day & Chocolate

The National Retail Federation says about 50 percent of consumers will buy candy for Valentine’s Day 2017, spending about $1.7 billion on candy alone. Are you buying chocolate for Valentine’s Day?

Some books about chocolate available in the library:

The Emperors of Chocolate: Inside the Secret World of Hershey and Mars by Joël Glenn Brenner

The New Taste of Chocolate: A Cultural and Natural History of Cacao with Recipes by Maricel E. Presilla

The Essence of Chocolate: Recipes for Baking and Cooking with Fine Chocolate by John Scharffenberger and Robert Steinberg with Ann Krueger Spivack and Susie Heller; photography by Deborah Jones

Photo credit: “Chocolate-2” by jules is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Coming around again?

Are LPs making a comeback? For those of us with stacks of them in the basement, they never left. But statistics show that there seems to be renewed interest in the format. In 2015, revenues from vinyl sales were $416 million, the highest level since 1988. RIAA keeps these statistics and has other information about music sales on its website. And there’s a historical connection for this time of the year—Edison demonstrated the hand-cranked phonograph for the first time near the end of the year in 1877.

Three’s a Crowd?

Were there 5 million people at the Cubs rally downtown last week? Everyone agrees that there were a lot of people there, but just how do they decide on a number? One estimation method was developed by journalism professor Herbert Jacobs in the 1960s. The method is described by msnbc in an article that discusses estimating crowds and some recent historical gatherings. And in 2011, Popular Mechanics magazine talked about some of the science behind crowd estimation.

 

Poetry

Do you think about poetry if you are not studying it for a class? Do you write poetry yourself? Do you enjoy reading poetry?

Some poetry facts:

  • You can find some poems celebrating autumn on the site Poets.org.
  • October 6 was National Poetry Day in England.
  • The 21st and current poet laureate of the United States is Juan Felipe Herrera, and he was poet laureate of California from 2012 to 2015. He has published more than a dozen collections of poetry and short stories and books for children and young adults.
  • Most states have or have had a poet laureate. The Library of Congress website has an interactive map to show information and history about the position in each state.
  • Kevin Stein, professor at Bradley University in Peoria, is the Illinois poet laureate. On the state’s poet laureate website, Stein says he wants to “foster an audience ranging from poetry newbies to those more seasoned devotees of the art.”

Search on poetry in the library’s catalog to find a variety of books on the subject.

Serious and Fun Career Information

capture-cjAre you sure or not-so-sure about your future career? The Bureau of Labor Statistics Career Outlook site has data and facts about occupations in the United States. If you want to be an accountant, you can find out about the future need for accountants and possible salary. Or, if you are thinking about being a nurse or a retail manager, you can find information about those careers.

If yocapture-hcu’re not sure about a career, you can do some browsing.

The BLS site has “You’re a What?” and “Interview with a …” features that highlight real people in real jobs. Here are some examples of jobs that may be new to you–

or may be very interesting to you–

capture-ccCloser to home, the MVCC library has books on general career information and books on specific career topics such as criminal justice, health care, and culinary arts.