We are back

The Library is open!!! We are ready for the spring 2017 semester!

Here are our upcoming hours:
Thursday, January 5th: 8:00AM-5:00PM
Friday, January 6th: 8:00AM-5:00PM
Saturday, January 7th: CLOSED
Sunday, January 8th: CLOSED
Monday, January 9th: 8:00AM-5:00PM
Tuesday, January 10th: 8:00AM-5:00PM
Wednesday, January 11th: 8:00AM-5:00PM
Thursday, January 12th: CLOSED (all staff in-service day)
Friday, January 13th: 8:00AM-5:00PM
Saturday, January 14th: CLOSED
Sunday, January 15th: CLOSED
Monday, January 16th: CLOSED (Martin Luther King, Jr Holiday)

Break Video: Civil Engineering

Happy winter break! Kick back and watch a video from our fall public events.
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Civil Engineering is a diverse profession that offers you variety in multiple sub-disciplines involving critical thinking, problem solving, team work and adventure. This lecture will discuss the science, mathematics, exploration of different components and benefits of becoming a Civil Engineer. Kimberly Hastings is Resident Engineer with an emphasizes in Structural Engineering. Currently managing and overseeing construction of a large rail project for the largest inland port in the United States. This event is part of the STEM series.

Oh, the Places You’ll Go with Civil Engineering!

Break Video: The Broadway Musical

Happy winter break! Kick back and watch a video from our fall public events.
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The Broadway Musical is an American invention that has moved across the world. With roots in the nineteenth century, the Broadway Musical fused together theater traditions, pop culture, pop music, and big production values into a new American standard. Faculty members Tommy Hensel and Craig Rosen explore this art form’s roots and impact. This is part of our One Book, One College program on the musical Hamilton.

The Broadway Musical: The Quintessential American Art Form

Break Video: Taking Action for Positive Change

Happy winter break! Kick back and watch a video from our fall public events.
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When Alexander Hamilton first arrived in New York, he quickly found a cause to become devoted to, as well as comrades who shared this passion. They recognized that a movement was building and that their participation would help to revolutionize the colonies. This kind of change often only seems possible in history books, but this panel will discuss how each of us can find the causes we’re passionate about, connect with others who feel the same, and effect change on our campus and in our communities. This is part of our One Book program on Hamilton

“This is not a moment, it’s the movement”: Taking action for positive change

Break Video: Leaving My Arab Homeland for the US

Happy winter break! Kick back and watch a video from our fall public events.
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Hear the diverse stories of Moraine Valley students who previously lived in Arab countries and have found a new home in the Chicago area. Each with their own unique journey, the students will discuss their transition to living in the US and share some of the challenges they have overcome and hopes for the future.

Resilient Journey: Leaving My Arab Homeland for a New Life in the US

Break Video: The Language of Hamilton

Happy winter break! Kick back and watch a video from our fall public events.
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Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton is a musical and major Broadway production, but it is also a text of poetry and a country’s shared language. Miranda notes that Alexander Hamilton wrote in dense, elaborate prose, and that the musical’s use of rap and hip hop allowed Miranda (as a song writer) to pack layers of meaning into the musical. This panel discussion will explore lyrics and text of Hamilton as literature, writing, and poetry. This is part of our One Book, One College program on the musical Hamilton.

Hamilton and the Use of Language: A Faculty Panel Discussion

Break Video: Good and Bad Statistics

Happy winter break! Kick back and watch a video from our fall public events.
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Each week a new poll about the 2016 elections comes out telling us who is ahead and who is behind. Each candidate promotes the polls that make them look best. Polls can be very useful, but most of us know that polls can be manipulated. Can we trust polls? Can we recognize the good and the bad? Faculty members from math and psychology look at how polls should be put together and how they can be biased. This is part of the One Book program on Hamilton.

You Get What You Ask For: The Good and Bad Uses of Statistics