The Return of the Green-Eyed Refugee


refugeeThe refugee crisis has been in the forefront of world news for the last two decades. The flow of people escaping from war and poverty numbers in the millions.  Today one of these refugees, made famous by National Geographic, was arrested.  This 12-year old girl was pictured on the June 1985 cover of the magazine and “captured the world’s attention.” Her story, like many of the refugee stories, was a combination of horror and bravery.   Read her story and perhaps you may want to find out more information on this world-wide problem. The MVCC library has an interesting selection of books and articles that address this issue.

Too Cool for the Nobel Prize?

Music’s mysterious cool guy: it’s a role that Bob Dylan has been filling for decades but he’s really taken it to the next level in the past couple of weeks.   There is a committee trying to reach him with news that almost every other artist would be delighted by… he won the Nobel Prize!!! Insert party here, right?  Well, not for him!  Read this article about how he won’t return the committee’s calls or get in touch with them.

Perhaps only Mr Dylan and his friends know why he’s playing coy, but let’s focus on what we do know: he won the Nobel Prize in Literature and he’s most famous for his songwriting. What do you think – is songwriting literature?  Even if he is one of the English-speaking world’s most poetic and truthful songwriters, should he be getting an award that usually goes to authors?   There is no right answer.. make up your own mind, it’s what Bob would want you to do! Learn about his body of work with the help of our collection:


Let the Work Speak for Itself

Progressive vs. Flat Tax?

On October 6th, the Library hosted Senator Pat McGuire, Chair of the Illinois Senate Higher Education Committee, along with a panel of Moraine students, in a discussion on how Illinois colleges are facing the impact of the current budget crisis. During the Q and A, the focus turned to sources of revenue and taxes. The point was made that while the terms progressive tax and flat tax are often thrown about, many people don’t actually know what they mean.

During the discussion, Senator McGuire referred to a couple of resources for differing views on tax information: the bipartisan Center for Tax and Budget Accountability and the nonpartisan Civic Federation of Chicago. In addition, the independent Tax Policy Center offers a Briefing Book (a “citizen’s guide” to the federal Tax System) and the Treasury Department Resource Center’s website has a page on The Economics of Taxation. But for a more direct explanation on the progressive tax vs. the flat tax, check out this Forbes article from Kelly Phillips Erb, aka the Taxgirl.

Finally, if you are a part of the Moraine Valley community (student, faculty, or staff), you have access to the SIRS Researcher database, which offers background and an array of viewpoints on the taxation issue through its Essential Questions. Looking for more? Visit a Moraine Valley Library (or the Library’s Ask A Librarian webpage).


New to Collection: “First Women” by Kate Andersen Brower

firstwomenWith the close of this presidential election season coming fast and furious, there is a real possibility that Hillary Clinton will become the first female president of the United States…leaving President Bill Clinton as “what” as far as terminology goes? The “First Gentleman” or “First Husband?” Whatever way it is phrased, this will be a unique situation and will be interesting to see what his role turns out to be in the White House depending on the election outcome. In the meantime, you might want to check out the latest book by Kate Andersen Brower, First Women: The Grace and Power of America’s Modern First Ladies located here in our catalog, and for a limited time upstairs in the Library Lounge at the “New Titles” display. There are two different spreads of photographs included in the book of our former First Ladies with some interesting facts. Here’s a tease: “Laura Bush, a Republican, and Michelle Obama, a Democrat, are closer than Michelle is with Hillary Clinton. During the 2008 presidential campaign, Laura defended Michelle when she came under criticism, and the two have since praised each others work as first ladies” (Brower). It is nice to learn that friendships are made beyond party lines.

Andersen is also the author of the New York Times bestseller The theresidenceResidence, which the Today Show has reviewed as “a revealing look at life inside the White House. . .it’s ‘Downton Abbey’ for the White House staff.” You can find this book here in our catalog.

We also have these two books in eAudioBook and eBook formats, made available through eRead Illinois. Check them out whichever way suits your fancy and enjoy some political reads before the election.

First Women eAudiobook ; First Women eBook ; The Residence eAudioBook ; The Residence eBook

Brower, Kate Andersen. First Women: The Grace and Power of America’s Modern First Ladies. New York: Harper, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, 2016. Print.


Resolved: Errors Accessing Databases from Off Campus

We believe the issue related to accessing the library’s electronic research databases and library user accounts has been resolved.  We are sorry for any inconvenience this may have caused.

If you are experiencing problems when logging into library resources from on or off campus, please, first, attempt to update your MVCC password by doing the following:

1).  First, register your security questions using our Password Reset Registration tool.  

2). Once registered, you can use the Password Reset link to answer your security questions and create a new password.  

You can also contact the HelpDesk to help you reset your password.  You can reach the HelpDesk at 708.608 Help (4357).

If the problem persists, please call or email the Library at 708.974-5234 or

Domestic Violence Awareness: Silent Witness/Survivor Speak Out

We wanted to make you aware of this special event which is happening just down the street from the MVCC campus. Our library has worked with Pillars on programming connected to domestic violence in the past, and we thought that students and faculty may want to be aware of this. Please note that this is not happening out our campus.

This event is a part of Domestic Violence Awareness Month this year. At the speak out survivors share their stories and our Silent Witness Exhibit is displayed. All attendees are welcome to share their story, a song, or poem about their experience during the open, safe forum. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me! I have attached a flyer for the event as well. Feel free to distribute accordingly!

Domestic Violence Awareness: Silent Witness/Survivor Speak Out
Date: Friday, October 28, 2016
Time: 7 pm-9 pm (doors open at 6:30 pm)
Cost: FREE (suggested donation of canned goods)
Details: Parking is available in the church parking lot. Refreshments will be provided.
Sponsored by: Sacred Heart Church Domestic Violence Outreach Ministry
For more info visit this link

Errors Accessing Databases from Off Campus

We are currently having reports from students that they are not able to access the library’s databases from off campus. This appears to have started late last night. We are working with IT to isolate and address the problem. Access from on campus is fine. The error seems to occur when logging in from home.

We are sorry for the inconvenience & headaches that this is causing. Once we have more info or a solution, we’ll let you know.

The Library of Congress Classification System (LC or LOC)


Library users may wish to understand the letters and numbers on the spines of books and on other items (CDs, maps, etc.) in the library collection. These numbers are Call Numbers. Melville Dewey created the Dewey Decimal Classification System and he pretty much used numbers on the first line. Perhaps the words call numbers persist because of the popularity of his system.

Anyway, the call number is a unique way of identifying the object (book, CD, etc.) and also its place in the collection. Before public libraries became wide-spread, libraries did not always allow users/patrons to go to the shelves to obtain the desired item. The staff at a desk received the request (call number) from the patron and then went to the shelf to obtain it. As you can see, the call number has a long-lived history of importance in the library.

So, what is the object of the letters and numbers? If you are interested in knowing about the Library of Congress Classification System, click here for a website showing the letters of the alphabet with their accompanying subjects. Pretty much, any classification system is a method of organizing knowledge. This concept is old. But as we have come to the present century and with the proliferation of print media and now electronic media, the idea of organizing knowledge has become daunting. The Library of Congress is the agency that deals with all of this growth and expansion and provides a place in the classification system for “new knowledge” or for new things presented in different ways (media).

Not all of the letters of the alphabet have been used. For example, there are no Is nor Os, nor Xs. After the first letter, the classification begins to expand thus: A, AA. AB, AC, and so on. This occurs for most of the letters. You may not realize that when you learned the alphabet in kindergarten and first grade that this knowledge might become useful!

After the letters, the subject of that area is further identified by the numbers, which ascend as usual (1….10….100….1000) and maybe a decimal point with numbers after. (Thanks, Melville, for that wonderful idea.)

Here is a call number:
Hv 6250.3 U5 L357 2014  

The online catalog has the availability and the location of this book. Most of the items that can be taken out (circulated) are housed on the lower level and circulate for 14 days with a possibility of renewal. The collection is divided with the call numbers A-K located on the west side of the room and the call numbers L-Z located on the east side of the room. All media and books are interfiled on the shelves.

The end panels of the stacks on the lower level have the range of call numbers for each section.                                                                                   unnamed

Still stumped? Go to the Information/Reference Desk (circle-shaped desk) and ask a librarian to help you.

#Hamilton & the Broadway Musical: The Quintessential American Art Form

The Broadway Musical is an American invention that has moved across the world. With roots in the nineteenth century, the Broadway Musical fused together theater traditions, pop culture, pop music, and big production values into a new American standard. Faculty members Tommy Hensel and Craig Rosen explore this art form’s roots and impact. This is part of our One Book, One College program on the musical Hamilton.
The Broadway Musical: The Quintessential American Art Form

The audio of this discussion is available below: